How to Ensure that you Write Every Day

Many writers have a difficult time to get to their desks on a consistent basis. Part of the problem is creating a habit of writing every day, despite all of our distractions and difficulties. Life is never problem- free it seems, and there is always something ready to catapult our writing time, if we let it.

In addition to your scheduled writing sessions, use odd bits of “down” time to write:

  • Your daily bus commute
  • Doctor appointments
  • Unexpected doctor visits
  • The half hour the cake needs to cool before you can ice it
  • Waiting for anything–a flight departure, the cable guy, your date to show up.

Always make sure you have something to write on (and with!), even if it means keeping a pen and small notebook in your fanny pack while jogging, or with your towel at the beach. You’ll be surprised how much you can actually accomplish in these short, otherwise unproductive periods.

A Place of Your Own

As important, perhaps, as a time to write is a place that you can lay claim to as your writing space–a place where you won’t be interrupted, where ideally you can leave your work out when you’re finished for the day. In addition to the space needed for your computer and printer, you should have plenty of desktop space to spread out your notes or any other materials you’re working with.

A bulletin board where you can pin-up inspirational quotes, pictures of settings or characters, deadlines, etc. is a great addition to your writing space. Make sure you have adequate lighting, a sturdy, comfortable chair and a handy shelf for your writing reference books. Whatever it takes, create a place that means writing to you–and to those around you–the minute you occupy it: your special place, your writing place.

The point is to make the most of whatever time and space you have. Writers work on subways, buses and commuter trains. Any place is a good place to write if you just recognize its possibilities. A quiet place is ideal, but–as anyone who has ever worked for a newspaper knows–it is possible to turn out good writing in the middle of utter chaos.

Starter-Sparkers

No matter what you accomplish in a writing session, you’ll frequently find yourself having to pick up in the middle of something left unfinished from a previous session, and you may be worried about maintaining your momentum, or picking up the thread of your thoughts. Here are some ideas that have worked for other writers:

Ernest Hemingway used to find it helpful to intentionally stop in the middle of a well-thought-out scene; he liked to stop writing before the juice was up. When he was eager to go on to the next word–when he knew exactly what he wanted to say and how he wanted to say it–that’s when he’d quit, often right in the middle of a sentence. With this system, Hemingway seldom had trouble getting started the following day. He knew the rest of the sentence he’d left hanging; he knew where he wanted the story to go next. He would simply begin the new writing session by finishing what he’d deliberately left unfinished the session before.

Hemingway’s system may work for you, too, but it requires discipline. It can be difficult to stop writing when the words are flowing. If you find this is a problem for you, you may want to try something else. Some writers, for example, warm up by simply retyping the last page from their previous session. Other writers will read their last page, delete it, and then rewrite the page as closely as they can from memory. Either practice can help you regain the momentum from your earlier work and give you a running start.

Whether you use any of these methods or concoct one of your own, the important thing is getting back to your writing project–whatever stage it is in–and continuing with it, making one step forward after another, and getting more and more words on the page.

Try it:

Irene S. Roth

Meet Brit Jones

coverHi Brit Jones!  It is GREAT to have you here on my blog!

1. Tell us a few things about yourself.

I’ve lived in Boulder, Colorado since 2004. I feel very fortunate to live in a place that has a high concentration of innovative thinkers. I’m the father of a 12 year old boy and have been privileged to receive the love and support of and wonderful family. My mother and father, as well as my two sisters and their husbands have been invaluable in their support of this book.

2. What’s your favorite book?

I’ve tended to gravitate towards books that teach me something about how to be better in life. I rarely read to escape, but rather to learn. If I were to choose an author and book I truly enjoyed, it would be “A Bridge Across Forever” by Richard Bach.

3. Who is your favorite author?

My favorite author is Richard Bach.

4. What inspired you to want to write your book?

It was never my intention to stay in the restaurant business as long as I have. But once life started happening and bills were piling up, it was a challenge to find other employment where I could make comparable money without taking several steps backward.

As I gathered more experience, it became glaringly obvious that the training programs most restaurants provide for servers don’t cover the important components of excellent service. Due to the transient nature of servers, coming and going, I could see that restaurant owners would be reluctant to provide thorough training for servers.

At the end of the day, waiting tables isn’t rocket science, but, with a few key guiding principles and suggestions on technique, service quality could certainly stand to improve. So I wrote this book for those servers who would like to discover their best selves in this line of work, as well as to provide a tool for restaurant owners and managers to elevate service quality without much investment of time and money.

5. Why do you like writing about your topic?

Simply because I have paid attention to what it takes to become better and I discovered how to articulate it. I know the topic through and through.

6. Tell us about your current writing projects.

Upon the completion of A Waiter’s Companion, I realized I have more to share on the subject. For now, I plan to market the current book, but I envision a complement to it down the road.

7. What can readers expect to get from this book?

It’s my hope that readers will discover the information to be helpful in providing structure to the learning experience and, ultimately, elevate the quality of service in restaurants across this country and around the world. Too often, a dining experience is diminished because servers have not been given the necessary training to do their job to the best of their abilities.

8. Any tips for aspiring writers?

Yes. We all have a book inside of us. When you discover yours, don’t let the opinions of others who can’t see your vision, discourage you from moving forward with it. There will always be those who will, either intentionally or unintentionally, discourage you. Push past that and bring it out of your head and into the world.

9.Any last words?

If you find something to be valuable, chances are, others will too.

The Writer’s Life: The Margaret Laurence Lectures

This is a great book about the 25th anniversary of the Lecture Series. It brings the best writers and everything that they say is necessary for a writer’s life.

Some of the stories are humorous. Others are more serious. But together, they are a threasure-throve of great tips for writers of all vintages from beginner to more mature writer.

Before an audience of peers, our greatest writers have revealed insights into their work, shared the challenges they faced in forging their careers, and give their unique perspectives on what it meant to be a part of an emerging national writing community.

Now in celebration of the series’ twenty-fifth anniversary, The Writers’ Trust is brining these lectures to the general public for the first time.

The result is a sparkling collection that ranges from sharp social commentary to deeply personal meditations.

This is a book that I will read and re-read. It is a book that every writer should read at some point in their lives. Why not now?

Rating: 5 stars

Reviewed by: Irene S. Roth

The Canadian Writer’s Market: The Essential Guide for Freelance Writers

This is a great book for writers about the state of the Canadian Writer’s market. It is a book that is necessary for all writers to be most successful in their writing careers.

It can be difficult to be a freelance writer in Canada. However, this book is an effective tool to help freelancers fend off such a nasty fate. With such a concise resource, writers trying to sell or place just about any competent piece of work will probably find places to find publication for their work.

The publishing industry is constantly changing. For freelance writers, it is essential to learn as much as possible about the opportunities and atmosphere of the publishing world in order to get a career off the ground and to grow their current business.

This book is designed to serve both the aspiring and the experienced freelance writer who needs some guidelines and accurate listings of potential markets.

The book also includes a section on self-published and e-books, which are making it easier for writers to get published.

Rating: 5 stars

Reviewed by: Irene S. Roth

The Write Track by Betty Jane Wylie

This is another book about how to succeed as a freelance writer in Canada. I have been reading a few books this month about this topic because I am a writer, and of course, I am writing in Canada. So, it is a book that I will read and re-read over the years.

This book is now revised and updated with a new chapter on electronic rights, is a personal and practical look at the author’s freelance experience as she tells how she made it from the uncertainty of a neophyte to the growing confidence of a veteran.

This book is a writer’s reference. It is packed with the information every freelance writer needs to know, including:

  • A writer’s self-evaluation: measuring the itch, the talent, the skills, the character, and the discipline necessary for success.
  • First steps: taking that leap into the freelance world and knowing where you might land.
  • Profiting from brainwaves: generating ideas and putting them to work.
  • Details of the writing life and the writing business: organizing your day, your office, your small business, your support team, and your marketing energy.
  • A writer’s right and responsibilities: contractual, moral, Canadian and electronic.

I loved this book from beginning to end. I will be suggesting it in my writing groups.

Rating: 5 Stars

Reviewed by: Irene S. Roth

Day 3: A. Law Shettleworth About Oh Brother!

cover-final-obDescribe your book to the readers. Here are some questions for you:

1. What is the theme of your book or description?

It is helping siblings learn to appreciate one another.

2. Who is the audience?

The audience is young children from age 4-8, unisex, sibling relationship, and family.

3. Who is your publisher Information

Lisa Umina – Halo Publishing
Tel: 877-705-9647
Mex: 55-5250-8519
Website: http://www.halopublishing.com

4. What is your Email?

It is alshettleworth@outlook.com

5. What is your contact information?

People can contact me several ways:

By email at: alshettleworth@outlook.com
Through Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/A.LawShettleworth/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Through Twitter at: https://twitter.com/alshettleworth

6. Where is it available for purchase? Amazon? Barnes and Noble?
It is available online:

Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Oh-Brother-Why-He-My/dp/161244329X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1476055872&sr=8-1&keywords=oh+brother+why+is+he+my+brother

Barnes & Noble:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/oh-brother-why-is-he-my-brother-a-law-shettleworth/1121279373?ean=9781612443294

Halo publishing:
http://www.halopublishing.com/6r-s/a-law-shettleworth.html

Indie’s bookstores:

Hicklebee’s
1378 Lincoln Ave.
San Jose, CA 95125
Phone: (408) 292-8880
FAX: (408) 292-6233
Email:hicklebees@hicklebees.com

Linden Tree Books
265 State Street
Los Altos, CA 94022
Phone: 650.949.3390
Email: info@lindentreebooks.com
To place an order, please call us.

Christopher’s Books
1400 18th Street (at Missouri)
San Francisco, CA 94107
415 255-8802
Email us: chrisbookssf@gmail.com

7. Do you have anything else to tell your reader?

I received a 5 stars review from Reader’s Favorite.

Thank you so much for being here on my blog today!

It has been GREAT getting to know you more as a writer!

I wish you every success in the future!

 

Day 2: A. Law Shettleworth’s Writing Life

self-portraitHi there!  It is GREAT to have you here on my blog today!

Describe Your Writing Life to the reader as a way to inspire others to read your book.

The beginning sentence is always the hardest, and it overwhelming to gather my thoughts together.  Who am I writing to?  What am I going to write?  Self-doubt gets in the way and procrastination comes second, and I found especially after I became a mother is very challenging to find the time to sit down and write.  On a light note, writing is addictive.  Once I put all self-doubt aside and my pen start flowing on a piece of paper, and the final piece of a thousand words just took my breath away.  Wow, I wrote a story, and it felt great.

I personally don’t write every day, but when ideas strikes I write it down.  I always have a small note pad in my purse, and I take creative orders.  I take out my pen and write down what comes to mind, it’s either something I see, hear or a pop of an idea.  I love writing it down on a napkin, I love how the ink smears over and every cursive word bleeds into each other creates art.  I draw triangles, squares or clouds to enhance my ideas, when it is fun to look at it keeps my writing flowing.

I love penmanship, I love to write on a piece of paper.  I am a very tangible person, so when I get into a writer’s block I just pick a word and write it down.  I like to write on all sort of textures, and use different color pens encourage my writing.  One word becomes a sentence, a sentence becomes a paragraph.

Yes, guilty as charged. I used a piece of recycle paper, and 2 squares of napkin filled with numbers, clouds, quotation marks and blue ink.  To me it’s perfect and I like it that way ha ha.